Jane Freilicher, Jimmy Schuyler, 1965, oil on canvas, 30 × 24 inches. Courtesy Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York."Of all the poets in Freilicher’s circle, it is Schuyler whose poetry most closely resembles Freilicher’s painting in terms of subject and approach." Jane Freilicher and the New York School of poets in the January 2014 issue of Poetry.

Jane Freilicher, Jimmy Schuyler, 1965, oil on canvas, 30 × 24 inches. Courtesy Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York.

"Of all the poets in Freilicher’s circle, it is Schuyler whose poetry most closely resembles Freilicher’s painting in terms of subject and approach."

Jane Freilicher and the New York School of poets in the January 2014 issue of Poetry.

—Michael Robbins, Poetry, January 2014Robbins discusses the reason for arts criticism in the Chicago Tribune. Read the rest of the January 2014 issue. Subscribe to Poetry.

—Michael Robbins, Poetry, January 2014

Robbins discusses the reason for arts criticism in the Chicago Tribune. Read the rest of the January 2014 issue.

Subscribe to Poetry.

Jane Freilicher, Nude on a Green Blanket, 1967, oil on linen, 25 × 30 inches.Courtesy Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York."Quite simply, she was famous for her wit." Painter Jane Freilicher and the New York School in the January 2014 issue of Poetry.

Jane Freilicher, Nude on a Green Blanket, 1967, oil on linen, 25 × 30 inches.
Courtesy Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York.

"Quite simply, she was famous for her wit." Painter Jane Freilicher and the New York School in the January 2014 issue of Poetry.

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W8ing 4 Godot.

—Wanda Coleman, Poetry, January 2014David Ulin reports on the weekend’s tributes to Wanda Coleman at the Los Angeles Times.

Wanda Coleman, Poetry, January 2014

David Ulin reports on the weekend’s tributes to Wanda Coleman at the Los Angeles Times.

Jane Freilicher, John Ashbery, c. 1954, pen and ink on paper, 13¾ × 10⅞ inches. Private collection, courtesy the Flow Chart Foundation and Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York. “She [Jane] is probably my favorite person in the world … Also everything she says is screamingly funny, although she doesn’t seem to intend it that way and I am always 
getting her in hot water by laughing at her gags in the presence of people who don’t seem to have noticed any humor going on.” 
— John Ashbery

Jane Freilicher, John Ashbery, c. 1954, pen and ink on paper, 13¾ × 10⅞ inches. Private collection, courtesy the Flow Chart Foundation and Tibor de Nagy Gallery, New York.

“She [Jane] is probably my favorite person in the world … Also everything she says is screamingly funny, although she doesn’t seem to intend it that way and I am always 
getting her in hot water by laughing at her gags in the presence of people who don’t seem to have noticed any humor going on.”

— John Ashbery

—Edward Hirsch, Poetry, October 1978Edward Hirsch was born on this day in 1950.

—Edward Hirsch, Poetry, October 1978

Edward Hirsch was born on this day in 1950.

—Randall Mann, Poetry, April 2010At the Los Angeles Times, David Ulin reviews Randall Mann’s collection, Straight Razor, calling Mann:
…the literary descendent of David Trinidad and Thom Gunn (no coincidence that his last book was called “Breakfast with Thom Gunn”), a writer of breathtaking honesty who can also, at times, turn to the punningly surreal.
Mann answers our editors’ questions about the poem.

—Randall Mann, Poetry, April 2010

At the Los Angeles Times, David Ulin reviews Randall Mann’s collection, Straight Razor, calling Mann:

…the literary descendent of David Trinidad and Thom Gunn (no coincidence that his last book was called “Breakfast with Thom Gunn”), a writer of breathtaking honesty who can also, at times, turn to the punningly surreal.

Mann answers our editors’ questions about the poem.

Once when I was harmless
and didn’t know any better,

a mirror to the front of me
and an ocean behind,

I lay wedged in the middle of daylight,
paper-doll thin, dreaming,

then I vanished. I gave the day a fingerprint,
then forgot.

—Carmen Giménez Smith, from “Photo of a Girl on a Beach

The National Book Critics Circle award has announced the 2013 awards finalists:

POETRY

Frank Bidart, Metaphysical Dog (Farrar, Straus & Giroux)

Lucie Brock-Broido, Stay, Illusion (Knopf)

Denise Duhamel, Blowout (University of Pittsburgh Press)

Bob Hicok, Elegy Owed (Copper Canyon)

Carmen Gimenez Smith, Milk and Filth (University of Arizona Press)

—William Stafford, Poetry, March 1968Stafford was born on this day in 1914. Poets House and Literary Arts are celebrating the centennial of his birth with some events: 
Poets House in New York: A free workshop for teenagers on Saturday, January 25 with poets Kim Stafford and Naomi Shihab Nye. 
Literary Arts in Portand, OR: William Stafford Centennial Celebration on Friday, February 7 with poets Li-Young Lee, Ted Kooser, Kim Stafford, Mary Szybist, Paulann Petersen and Matthew Dickman. We have dozens and dozens more Stafford poems in our archive. Which is your favorite?

—William Stafford, Poetry, March 1968

Stafford was born on this day in 1914. Poets House and Literary Arts are celebrating the centennial of his birth with some events:

  • Poets House in New York: A free workshop for teenagers on Saturday, January 25 with poets Kim Stafford and Naomi Shihab Nye.

  • Literary Arts in Portand, OR: William Stafford Centennial Celebration on Friday, February 7 with poets Li-Young Lee, Ted Kooser, Kim Stafford, Mary Szybist, Paulann Petersen and Matthew Dickman.

    We have dozens and dozens more Stafford poems in our archive. Which is your favorite?